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Showing posts with label health. Show all posts
Showing posts with label health. Show all posts

Monday, November 19, 2018

10 Things You Can Do on United Nations World Toilet Day

10 Things You Can Do on United Nations World Toilet Day


Every year on 19 November, World Toilet Day is a chance to get involved in the global movement for toilets and sanitation for all, and raise awareness of the need for action to end the sanitation crisis. In 2013, 19 November was designated as UN World Toilet Day. The theme for this year’s World Toilet Day is dignity and equality, inspiring action to end open defecation and putting a spotlight on how access to improved sanitation leads to a reduction in assault and violence on women. 

Sustainable sanitation is a matter of dignity, equality, and safety, and is crucial to improving the health and wellbeing of one-third of humanity. What can you do to help make ‘sanitation for all’ a reality this World Toilet Day?

1. Run in The ‘Urgent Run’

Participate in The Urgent Run or host your own event for this year’s UN World Toilet Day. The Urgent Run (www.urgentrun.com) is a global mobilisation event to draw attention to the urgent calls for action to end the sanitation crisis. Sixteen events have been registered in 12 countries including Singapore, India, the Philippines, Indonesia, Ghana, Italy, Senegal, and Mozambique. If you can’t wait to see health, dignity and wellbeing for all through sustainable sanitation, join The Urgent Run, or hold an event. 

2. Do a ‘Big Squat’ 

Hold a big squat and raise awareness of the more than 1 billion people who face the indignity of open defecation, which spreads diseases including cholera, typhoid, hepatitis and diarrhoea. Stop, drop, squat and share! Get friends, colleagues, classmates or family together, invite people in the local community and squat in a public place. Take photos or video, and share them on YouTube, Vimeo, Vine, Instagram, Flickr, Facebook or Twitter. Use the hashtags #bigsquat, #worldtoiletday and #opendefecation. 

3. Share

Access to sanitation would make life safer and healthier for 1.25 billion women. Join the global movement for toilets and sanitation for all, and raise awareness by posting on Facebook, Instagram, Google+, posting a Vine or Tweeting this World Toilet Day. Show that you give a crap about toilets and sanitation, and raise your voice to call for action. Use the hashtags #wecantwait #worldtoiletday #opendefecation #sanitation and #igiveashit.  

4. Become a toilet advocate 

Clean and safe toilets are fundamental for health, dignity, privacy, equality and education. Contact your local representative, community leader or member of parliament and let them know you care about public toilets in your area. Does your town need new public toilets? Are the toilets safe and accessible, clean and well-maintained? Is there an appropriate ratio of toilets for men and women, or ‘potty parity’? Talk toilets with your local representative today. 

5. Watch  

Watch a World Toilet Day playlist and share videos on Facebook or Twitter to join the call for toilets and sanitation for all. Here’s one to start with – meet Mr Toilet. Jack Sim is a man on a mission to end the sanitation crisis, and he started by tackling the toilet taboo. Meet the man behind the World Toilet Organization who is proud to be called ‘Mr. Toilet’.

6. Talk crap!

1,000 children died per day from diarrhoeal diseases due to poor sanitation in 2013. These deaths are preventable, but what we don’t discuss, we can’t improve. Help break the ‘toilet taboo’ by talking crap with friends and family, colleagues, classmates or neighbours: have a conversation, send an email, send a text, post to Facebook, and raise awareness of the importance of action on sanitation. 

7. Toilet Selfie 

Did you know that more people own a mobile phone than have access to a toilet? Next time you go to the bathroom, think about how lucky you are, and snap a #toiletselfie and post it to Instagram, Facebook or Twitter for World Toilet Day – and keep it clean! Let your friends know they’re lucky if they have access to a toilet and encourage them to join the sanitation movement. 

8. Invest in toilets and sanitation for all

One third of the world’s population still lacks access to adequate sanitation. Donate to support the work of the World Toilet Organization at worldtoilet.org and your donation will go towards advocacy and awareness, and to support capacity building and social enterprise sanitation projects in Cambodia, India, and Mozambique.

9. Learn 

Did you know that toilets and sanitation are considered a human right? In 2010, the UN General Assembly recognised sanitation and water as a human right, essential to the full enjoyment of life and all other human rights. Visit World Toilet Organization’s website worldtoilet.org and the UN World Toilet Day website unwater.org/worldtoiletday to learn about the sanitation crisis and how you can get involved. 

10. Tell us what you’re doing 

How will you commemorate UN World Toilet Day on 19 November? Join the call for action to end the sanitation crisis on UN World Toilet Day, and share what you’re doing. Reply to @worldtoilet and @UN_Water on Twitter or email online@worldtoilet.org. Some of the best activities will be featured on the World Toilet Day website and in World Toilet Organization’s social media.  

via http://worldtoilet.org

Sunday, April 2, 2017

5 surprising benefits of going braless


If there is one thing that almost every woman will agree on it is this: There is nothing quite so freeing as that moment when you slip off your bra at the end of a long day. Even a good bra will pinch, tug and chafe as the day goes on, so is it really any wonder that it feels so good to cast it off and set the ladies free?
If you've ever wondered what it might feel like to go completely braless for a day, why not give it a try on Oct. 13 — a day officially recognized as National No Bra Day? The basic premise is that it is a day set aside to raise awareness about breast cancer (though no reputable cancer organizations claim an association with it) and remind women it's time to take a closer look at what's happening inside their undergarments.
Need more good reasons to go braless? Here are five:
1. Bras do nothing for your boobs. If you're like me, you might be under the impression that wearing a bra may keep your boobs from sagging over time. In fact, the opposite is true. In a study at France's University of Franche-Comté, professor Jean-Denis Rouillon found that breast muscle tissue was stronger in women who did not wear a bra. The same study, which tracked women over a 15-year-period, found that bras don't actually do anything to improve the overall health or appearance of your boobs.
2. Going braless improves circulation. It's kind of a no-brainer that when you remove your bra — and thereby remove the constricting band encircling your chest — your circulation will improve. Better circulation equates to healthier and firmer skin, and who couldn't use a little bit more of that?
3. Your boobs will be "perkier." Rouillon's study found that the nipples of women who went braless were an average of 7 millimeters higher than those of the women who did wear bras. Higher nipples = perkier boobs.
4. It just feels better. Why not enjoy that end-of-the day comfort all day long by skipping the bra, even if just for one day? If you're worried about how it will look, try wearing a top with a built-in shelf bra to get the benefits of support without the constriction of a bra.
5. Going braless gives you a chance to check things out. Ditching the bra for one day will give you a better opportunity to get up close and personal with your boobs in a way that you would not if they were ensconced in fabric. Now is a good time to do that breast self-exam you keep forgetting about and to make that mammogram appointment you've been meaning to schedule all year.

Friday, March 10, 2017

50 ​Fitness Truths


Fitness Truths


  1. Carbohydrates, protein, fat, and alcohol have 4, 4, 9, and 7 calories per gram respectively.
  2. You need to burn about 3500 calories to lose 1 pound of fat.
  3. Insulin and growth hormone have an inverse relationship. You must keep insulin under control if you want growth hormone to do its job of mobilizing fat.
  4. The average person can store 500 grams of glycogen.
  5. Only fat and protein are essential macronutrients – carbohydrates aren't (but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them).
  6. Muscle glycogen is about 3 parts water to 1 part glucose. This can add water weight at the beginning of a strength training program.
  7. You burn more calories during the 23 hours you don't exercise than the 1 hour you do.
  8. You don't need to do cardio to lose weight. You only need a calorie deficit. But that doesn't mean it isn't a useful tool.
  9. The fat burning zone does not burn more total fat calories – only a higher percentage of calories from fat. Total calories burned is what matters.
  10. You're never too old to do squats.
  11. Weight loss is not a physical challenge – it's a mental one.
  12. The scale cannot measure your body fat. However, this body fat caliper can. Use it.
  13. You can eat anything you want and still lose weight – but weight doesn't always equal fat.
  14. You can't target fat loss – fat loss is systemic.
  15. Muscle does not weigh more than fat – it's just denser than it.
  16. Zero grams of fat on a label doesn't always mean there's no fat in the food product. Always check the ingredients.
  17. Whole grain bread can contain many artificial chemicals – pick one that uses only whole food ingredients.
  18. Eating healthy is not more expensive than a junk food diet, especially once you consider health care costs down the road.
  19. You can't calculate body fat percentage from height and weight alone – you need to physically measure it.
  20. You can get glucose from both protein and glycerol – not just carbohydrates.
  21. Just because a box says "whole grain" on it, it doesn't make it healthy.
  22. You should never attempt weight loss at the expense of your health.
  23. Trying to be perfect with your diet sets you up for failure. Strive to make progress by continually creating healthy eating habits.
  24. Workout times and negative side effects are positively correlated. The quality of your workouts is more important than the quantity.
  25. Gym membership prices are usually negotiable. Don't be afraid to ask.  
  26. Cooking your food can both lower some nutrient content, and make some more bio-available.
  27. There's a high correlation between the fitness level of the people close to you, and your own physical fitness.
  28. It's harder to put on 10 pounds of muscle than it is to lose 10 pounds of fat.
  29. Once an adult, fat cells can be created, but they cannot be lost – only shrunken. But that doesn't mean they can't shrink to close to nothing.
  30. Eating at night does not make you fat – overeating does.
  31. You don't need to do curls to get good biceps. Heavy rowing movements are excellent arm builders.
  32. Being skinny does not automatically mean you have a low body fat. Body composition is what matters most.
  33. The perimeter of the grocery store is where 90% of the healthy food is.
  34. If bad food is in the house, you'll be more likely to eat it.
  35. Thyroid hormone output and exercise intensity are positively correlated.
  36. Healthy levels of testosterone are good for both men and women.
  37. You don't need a gym membership to strength train. Your body weight is all the resistance you need.
  38. 90% of people underestimate how many calories they need to eat to lose weight. Use my calorie calculator to determine the correct calorie intake for fat loss.
  39. Workout intensity is positively correlated with the degree of EPOC – the afterburn effect. Boost your intensity if you want to burn more fat.
  40. There are 3 types of skeletal muscle fibers – type I, type II-A, and type II-B.
  41. 80% of people who begin an exercise program will quit. About the same goes for people starting a diet.
  42. The body has 3 energy systems – ATP-PC, anaerobic glycolysis, and aerobic.
  43. Strength gains come from muscle hypertrophy and improved muscle fiber recruitment. Include a variety of rep ranges in your workouts.
  44. Dehydrating a muscle by 3% can cause a 10% loss of strength. Drink plenty of water throughout the day.
  45. The thermic effect of food (TEF) is highest for protein. Up to 30% of its calories are used for digestion and assimilation.
  46. Lactic acid is not the cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Lactic acid returns to normal levels within 60 minutes of finishing exercise.
  47. The more muscle mass you have, the more calories you burn at rest. Muscle tissue eats fat at all hours of the day.
  48. Direct abdominal exercises are not necessary to get good abs. Abs are used as stabilizers when you do squats, deadlifts, and many other exercises. Only a good diet will make them visible.
  49. You can lose weight and still gain muscle; likewise, you can also gain weight while still losing fat.
  50. Consistency and patience are key to long term successful weight loss.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

"Sex breaks" for Office staff proposed by Swedish politician


Workers in a small town in northern Sweden could get more productive after a councillor's proposal for staff 'sex breaks'.
The idea of one-hour paid breaks for workers to go home and get intimate is aimed at improving Swedish couples' relationships, local politician Per-Erik Muskos says.
"There are studies that show sex is healthy," he told AFP news agency.
Couples aren't spending enough time with each other in today's busy world, he says.
He did point out there was no way to prove workers would take the opportunity to jump in the sack, but says they should be trusted with the break.
"You can't guarantee that a worker doesn't go out for a walk instead," he told AFP.
Swedish employees have an envied work-life balance. After Finland and France, they work the fewest hours, compared with the rest of Europe. In 2015, they worked an average of 1685 hours per year.
Newshub.

Thursday, September 29, 2016

World Heart Day 2016

World Heart Day 2016




Thursday, May 12, 2016

Did You Know?

Did You Know?









@Healthy Society

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

10 most important things you need to know about Zika virus

The Zika virus (yellow) is strongly suspected of causing birth defects. 
[Science Photo Library]

What is Zika virus?
Zika virus is a mosquito-transmitted infection related to dengue, yellow fever and West Nile virus.
Symptoms are mild and include fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis (red eyes).
Just one in five people infected becomes ill. Hospitalisation is uncommon and deaths are rare.
How does it spread?
Zika is primarily spread through the bite of an infected Aedes species of mosquito.
Pregnant women can also pass the virus to their babies during pregnancy but how and when this happens is unclear.
Those infected can pass the virus on through a mosquito bite for about seven days after infection.
There are no reports of transmission through breastfeeding, but in a few cases the virus has been reported to have been passed on through blood transfusion and sexual contact.
Where is Zika?
The latest outbreak is in 23 countries in the Carribean, Central America, South America, Mexico and Puerto Rico. 
Past outbreaks have been in Gabon, Egypt, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Côte d'Ivoire, the Central African Republic, Cambodia, Micronesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, India, Thailand, Philippines, and Indonesia. 

How did Zika get to Brazil?
Nothing has been proven but Zika may have been brought to Brazil by participants of the Va’a World Sprint Canoeing World Championships, held in August 2014.
Athletes came from French Polynesia, New Caledonia, the Cook Islands and Easter Island.
It has also been suggested that Zika was brought by Asian tourists attending the 2014 FIFA World Cup, raising concerns that the Olympics, starting in Rio de Janeiro on August 5, will result in further spread of the virus.
How is Zika diagnosed?
A blood or tissue sample from the first week in the infection must be sent to an advanced laboratory.
The virus can be detected through sophisticated molecular testing that seeks out the active virus, which lasts in the body for about a week.
Research is being done to develop a rapid test which could look for antibodies after a patient has recovered from the virus, making it possible to test for immunity.
How is Zika treated?
There is no vaccine or specific medicine currently available and treatment is normally focused on relieving the symptoms.
Can a vaccine be developed?
In theory a vaccine is possible but development testing and trials for human vaccines normally take years and cost hundreds of millions of dollars.
A number of companies, including Inovio, Hawaii Biotech, GSK and Sanofi are developing or considering working on a vaccine. 
Last year Sanofi received approval for the world’s first dengue vaccine.
Dengue is closely related to Zika but Sanofi is cautious about whether it could be adapted.
“There are too many unknowns about Zika to reliably judge the ability to research and develop a vaccine effectively at this time,” it said in a statement.
What is microcephaly and how is it linked?
Microcephaly is a birth defect characterised by incomplete brain development and an unusually small head.
It is a life-long condition with no cure or standard of treatment, and is linked with conditions such as seizures, developmental delays and intellectual problems.
Microcephaly is normally uncommon. In the US, there are typically between two and 12 cases per 10,000 newborns. 
The condition is being reported in the worst Zika-affected areas in Brazil at dramatically higher rates: 100 cases for every 10,000, or 1 percent of births.
Research from Brazil has suggested there is a correlation between the location and timing of this Zika outbreak and the increase in cases of microcephaly, but there is currently no proof that the virus causes the birth defect.
However, Zika virus has been found in the amniotic fluid of pregnant women with the virus and in the placentas and brains of miscarried fetuses with microcephaly. The World Health Organisation's Director-General Dr Margaret Chan says a causal link is "strongly suspected".

Why was the potential link between Zika and birth defects not previously observed?
In areas where Zika has been active for decades, such as Central Africa and Asia, most people are infected early in life, so the risk of infection during pregnancy is small.
The population in the Americas has not had exposure to the virus until now.
This means more women are now being exposed to the virus for the first time during pregnancy, possibly increasing the risk of birth defects.
This is why public health officials are telling women to avoid getting pregnant, at least until they have had the virus, or Zika has been brought under control.
Can GM mosquitos stop the virus?

British biotech company Oxitec has produced genetically modified Aedes aegyptimosquitoes by introduing two genes into its DNA.
One of them makes its eggs glow under UV light, helping with identification.
The other causes ithe mosquito's offspring to die.
Oxitec says that by releasing the GM mosquitos into infected areas populations of Aedes aegypti can be reduced by more than 80 percent, thereby reducing transmission of Zika.
Oxitec says there is no way the mosquitos' modified DNA can transfer into humans or other mammals and insects, but public fears over genetic modification mean the technique is controversial.
Source: Al Jazeera

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

The Benefits Of Good Posture

The Benefits Of Good Posture


Saturday, December 22, 2012

Top Ten Most Polluted Places in the World, 2012

Top Ten Most Polluted Places in the World, 2012

This Top Ten list was compiled by the Technical Advisory Board of the Blacksmith Institute, an environmental NGO based in New York. The criteria used in ranking include the size of the affected population, the severity of the toxins involved, and reliable evidence of health problems associated with the pollution.

Source: the Blacksmith Institute, 2012. Web: http://www.worstpolluted.org/ .

CountryProblemMain Pollutant ExposurePathway
Linfen, ChinaAir PollutionCoal dust, fly ash, carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide and arsenicInhalation
Bhopal, IndiaIndustrial ChemicalsIsocyanate gas, pesticide productionIngestion of contaminated groundwater
Central Kalimantan province, IndonesiaArtisanal Gold MiningMercuryInhalation of airborne vapors
Kasargod, IndiaPesticideEndosulfanInhalation, ingestion
Dzerhinsk, RussiaChemical weapons manufactureChemical wasteIngestion of contaminated groundwater
Sumgayit, AzerbaijanIndustrial and Agricultural Chemical ProductionOrganic chemicalsInhalation of airborne vapors
Tianying, ChinaContaminated Surface WaterLeadInhalation, ingestion
Sukinda, IndiaMetals Processing and MiningHexavalent chromiumInhalation, ingestion
Chernobyl, UkraineRadiationRadioactive wasteIngestion
Arctic CanadaOrganic chemical accumulationPersistent organic pollutants (POPs)Ingestion

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Ten Truth about Blood transfusion - World Blood Donor Day 2012




1. Blood transfusion saves lives and improves health.
However, many patients requiring transfusion do not have timely access to safe blood. Every country needs to ensure that blood supplies are sufficient and free from HIV, hepatitis viruses and other infections that can be transmitted through unsafe transfusion.

2. Transfusions are used to support various treatments.
In high-income countries, transfusion is most commonly used to support advanced medical treatment and complex surgeries like open-heart surgery and advance trauma care. In low- and middle-income countries it is used often for management of pregnancy-related complications, childhood malaria complicated by severe anaemia and trauma-related injuries.

3. An adequate supply of safe blood can only be assured through regular donation by voluntary unpaid blood donors.
Adequate supply of safe blood can only be assured through regular donation by voluntary unpaid blood donors, because the prevalence of bloodborne infections is lowest among these donors. It is higher among donors who give blood only as a replacement when it is required for a family and among those who give blood for money or other forms of payment.

4. Voluntary unpaid donors account for 100% of blood supplies in 62 countries.
Since the inception of World Blood Donor Day in 2004, 111 countries have reported an increase in the number of voluntary donations. But in 40 countries, less than 25% of blood supplies come from voluntary unpaid donors.

5. Around 92 million blood donations are collected globally every year.
About 50% of these are donated in low- and middle-income countries where nearly 85% of the world’s population lives. The average blood donation rate is more than 13 times greater in high-income countries than in low-income countries.

6. Collections at blood centres vary according to income group.
About 8000 blood centres in 159 countries report collecting, on an average, 10 000 blood donations per centre (range from 20 to almost 500 000). The average annual collection per blood centre is 30 000 in high-income countries, 7500 in middle-income countries and 3700 in low-income countries.

7. People in high-income countries donate blood more frequently than in low- or middle-income countries.
The median blood donation rate in high-income countries is 36.4 donations per 1000 people. This compares with 11.6 donations per 1000 people in middle-income countries and 2.8 donations in low-income countries.

8. Donated blood should always be screened.
All donated blood should always be screened for HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and syphilis prior to transfusion. Yet in 39 countries not all donated blood is tested for one or more of these infections. Testing is not reliable in many countries because of staff shortages, poor quality test kits, irregular supplies, or lack of basic laboratory services.

9. A single unit of blood can benefit several patients.
Separating blood into its various components allows a single unit of blood to benefit several patients and provides a patient only the blood component which is needed. About 91% of the blood collected in high-income countries, 72% in middle-income countries and 31% in low-income countries is separated into blood components.

10. Unnecessary transfusions expose patients to needless risk.
Often transfusions are prescribed when simple and safe alternative treatments might be equally effective. As a result such a transfusion may not be necessary. An unnecessary transfusion exposes patients to the needless risk of infections or severe transfusion reactions

From - WHO

Friday, December 3, 2010

International Day of Disabled Persons 2010 - December 3rd



International Day of Persons with Disabilities is annually observed on 3 December with an objective to promote an awareness of disability issues, the fundamental rights of persons with disabilities and integration of persons with disabilities in the main stream of each aspect of the social, political, economic and cultural status of their communities. The day extends an opportunity to initialize action to reach the target of full and equal pleasure of human rights and contribution in society by disabled persons, launched by the World Program of Action for Disabled Persons, declared by the UN General Assembly in the year 1982.

History of United Nations and Disable Persons

Over the period of the United Nations' first 50 years, disable persons have become importantly proactive in asserting empowerment and confidence in their own respective abilities to lead self-dependent lives. The following precise history represents efforts by the UN which have endorsed their efforts.
The foundation of The United Nations was based on the principle of equality for all. The Preamble to the United Nations Charter states the elegance and worth of every human being and provides elementary significance to the advocacy of social justice. Disable Persons are entitled to all the fundamental human rights declared by the Charter and their human rights instruments.
The General Assembly launched the foundation for the protection and promotion of human rights in the year 1948, when it endorsed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Article 25 of the Declaration proclaims that each person has "the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.”
The Theme of 2009 “Empowering Persons with Disability with a Right to Act”
On 3rd of December, 2009, and throughout the week starting from this day, people across the world joined together to recognize the persons with disabilities expressing support, and enhancing awareness. This year was focused on the right to act. People with disabilities should be assisted and supported by other people of their own free sweet will in taking their decisions, was the objective of this year.
The right to act is universally endorsed as a fundamental and basic human right. Its implementation as a right to all individual seems so rudimentary that we forget that for persons with disabilities, the right to work is not always imperative. In terms of physical, institutional and attitudinal barriers, disable persons are often refrained from their right to act.
Today, change is imperative!
The Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities had called upon all states to revise the laws, practice and regulations in their respective country in tune with the Convention on this particular day of recognition. It was a call for the end of discrimination for all disabled persons and the endorsement of the right to act, as a basic and fundamental virtue for every person all over the world.
This day provides us with a chance to make a dedicated commitment to the principles of entrusting powers to the disabled persons with the right to act.

Activities conducted on this day include:

  • Conducting days of discussion and campaigns raising awareness on the theme of right to act.
  • Ensuring that legislation ensured that the disabled people are provided with the right to select helps on their own free will.
  • Revising policy to enable all persons the capability to open and handle bank accounts including disabled persons of any kind;
  • Taking measures to extinguish the guardianship method and to replace it by a process in which persons with disabilities are assisted only in their own decision making.

1981, International Year of Disabled Persons
1981 was proclaimed The International Year of Disabled Persons (IYDP) by the General Assembly in 1976. It launched a plan of action at the national, international and regional levels, with an emphasis on similar opportunities, rehabilitation and prevention of disabilities.
The theme of IYDP was "full participation and equality", designated as the right of disable persons to participate entirely in the life and development of their respective societies, enjoy good living conditions similar to those of other people, and have an equal share in developed conditions after socio-economic development.
Other objectives of the Year
Enhancing public awareness; knowledge and acceptance of disabled persons and enabling persons with disabilities to build bodies through which they can manifest their views and promote activities to improve their conditions.
Role of Handicap International
Since its inception, as long as 20 years, Handicap International has transformed from being an emergency body with a medical emphasis on disabled people, to an institution which promotes the human rights of disabled people.
The organization is working in collaboration with Disabled Peoples’ Organizations at regional, national and international levels to understand disabled people worldwide and encourage their inclusion into the stream of society. Handicap International assists organizations in developing countries and Europe to incorporate the convention and other legal techniques in every day life.
The Actual Facts and figures
The World Health Organization affirms that there are 600 million disabled people living worldwide, about almost 10% of the entire earth population. It is also evaluated that about 80% of these disabled people live in developing nations.
Globally, it is assumed that one in every ten people is a person with a disability and recent studies states that persons with disabilities populates up to 20 per cent of the population living in under poverty line in developing countries. Number of persons with disabilities still face barriers to their participation in activities of their communities and are mostly compelled to live under the poverty line.  Many disabled persons are also forced into organizations, a simple breach of the rights to freedom to live in their respective communities.

Source - WHO

Friday, December 25, 2009

Fattest Countries

Fattest Countries in the World


More than 1.6 billion people in the world are either overweight or obese, according to a recent study by the World Health Organization. Here’s a look at the countries with the highest percent of overweight adults (people age 15 and over). People are considered overweight if their body mass index (BMI) is 25 or higher and obese with a BMI or 30 or higher.



There are currently 1.6 billion overweight adults in the world, according to the World Health Organization. That number is projected to grow by 40% over the next 10 years. The following list reflects the percentage of overweight adults aged 15 and over. These are individuals who have individual body mass indexes, which measures weight relative to height, greater than or equal to 25. Obese is defined as having a BMI greater than or equal to 30.



RankCountry%
1.Nauru94.5
2.Micronesia, Federated States of91.1
3.Cook Islands90.9
4.Tonga90.8
5.Niue81.7
6.Samoa80.4
7.Palau78.4
8.Kuwait74.2
9.United States74.1
10.Kiribati73.6
11.Dominica71.0
12.Barbados69.7
13.Argentina69.4
14.Egypt69.4
15.Malta68.7
16.Greece68.5
17.New Zealand68.4
18.United Arab Emirates68.3
19.Mexico68.1
20.Trinidad and Tobago67.9
21.Australia67.4
22.Belarus66.8
23.Chile65.3
24.Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)65.2
25.Seychelles64.6
26.Bahrain64.1
27.Andorra63.8
28.United Kingdom63.8
29.Saudi Arabia63.5
30.Monaco62.4
31.Bolivia62.2
32.San Marino62.1
33.Guatemala61.2
34.Mongolia61.2
35.Canada61.1
36.Qatar61.0
37.Uruguay60.9
38.Jordan60.5
39.Bahamas60.4
40.Iceland60.4
41.Nicaragua60.4
42.Cuba60.1
43.Germany60.1
44.Brunei Darussalam59.8
45.Slovenia59.8
46.Peru59.6
47.Vanuatu59.6
48.Finland58.7
49.Jamaica57.4




50.Israel57.3
51.Saint Lucia57.3
52.Austria57.1
53.Azerbaijan57.1
54.Turkey56.8
55.Tuvalu56.6
56.Dominican Republic56.5
57.Slovakia56.3
58.Cyprus56.2
59.Saint Kitts and Nevis56.1
60.Costa Rica55.8
61.Colombia55.6
62.Antigua and Barbuda55.5
63.Switzerland55.4
64.Montenegro54.9
65.Serbia54.9
66.Serbia and Montenegro (The former state union of)54.9
67.Albania54.8
68.Fiji54.8
69.Bulgaria54.2
70.Luxembourg54.2
71.Croatia53.9
72.Bosnia and Herzegovina53.8
73.Portugal53.8
74.Armenia53.3
75.Grenada53.3
76.South Africa53.3
77.Iran (Islamic Republic of)53.2
78.Libyan Arab Jamahiriya53.2
79.Lithuania53.1
80.Lebanon53.0
81.Czech Republic52.9
82.Syrian Arab Republic52.8
83.Spain51.8
84.Hungary51.6
85.Panama51.4
86.Tunisia51.0
87.Saint Vincent and the Grenadines50.6
88.Brazil50.5
89.Belize49.8
90.Sweden49.7
91.Norway49.1
92.Russian Federation49.1
93.El Salvador48.7
94.Lesotho48.5
95.Suriname47.8
96.Paraguay47.7
97.Guyana47.5
98.Poland47.5
99.Latvia47.3
100.The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia47.2


Source: World Health Organization.

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