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Saturday, June 6, 2009

STRANGE BEACHES

Five strange beaches in the world...


Beach with black sand

Punaluu Beach (also called Black Sand Beach) is a beach between Pāhala and Nāʻālehu on the Big Island of the U.S. state of Hawaii. The beach has black sand made of basalt and created by lava flowing into the ocean which explodes as it reaches the ocean and cools. This volcanic activity is in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.
Punaluʻu is frequented by endangered Hawksbill Turtles and Green Sea Turtles, which can often be seen basking on the black sand. Visitors must remain 15 feet (4½ m) from the turtles at all times. The swimming area is very rocky, and it can be dangerous to swim. The beach also has a large amount of underground fresh water that flows in it. This fresh water is very cold and looks almost like gasoline mixing with the water. Legend has it that in the time of drought, the early Hawaiians living in the area would dive underwater with a jug to get their fresh water.


Beach with green sands


Papakolea Beach (also known as Green Sand Beach, Mahana Beach and, erroneously, Puʻu Mahana) is a green sand beach located at South Point, in the Kaʻu district of the island of Hawaii. One of only two green sand beaches in the world, the other being in Guam, the beach gets distinctive coloring from olivine crystals found in a nearby cinder cone.


Beach with white sand

White Sand Beach the longest and most popular beach on Koh Chang. It is about 2.5 kilometres long and lined by rocks, over-hanging palms and broad-leaved trees.The southern 1.5 kilometre long area, located at the road, is during the season the busiest part of the entire island. The main road runs pass all the resorts, shops, restaurants, pubs and coconut groves. White Sand Beach it is the best place for those who enjoy the white wonderful sand and the association with other travelers: most visitors prefer coming to this beach that makes the beach so colorful.The beach slopes gently into the sea and is very wide during low tide attracting hordes of visitors, especially in the evening, when it transforms into a playground. Regular football and volleyball games are played as the sun sets right off its shore.



Beach with white & pink sand

The Great and Little Santa Cruz Islands are, arguably, this city's best beaches, and one of the country's best island beaches destination. In its ideal natural state, there is no comparison to the uniquely beautiful "pinkish" sand (a coloration effect of pulverized rare red Organ-pipe Coral ( tubipora musica) from eons of surf erosion mixed in with the white sand) and colorful coral reef just a few feet away from the shore of the Great Santa Cruz Island. The nearby Little Santa Cruz Island has beautiful white sand instead, and is a military installation (read: Navy resort). Snorkeling and scuba diving are excellent diversions for the sun worshipers with lots of colorful marine life to experience in excellent water visibility, depending on weather conditions. In the Great Santa Cruz Island, there are some covered huts around for picnicking (food and water can be brought in), and adequate bathroom facilities.



Beach with red sand

Red Sand Beach (also known as Kaihalulu) is a pocket beach on the island of Maui, Hawaii. It lies on the side of Ka'uiki Hill, which is a cindercone hill just south of Hana Bay, on the eastern half of the island.
Red Sand Beach is partially shielded from the rough open ocean by an offshore reef. The result is a natural sea wall that protects the bay from large waves.
Kaihalulu is one of the few red sand beaches in the world, and it boasts picturesque scenery. The sand is a deep red-black, which contrasts with the blue water, the black sea wall, and the green ironwood trees. The cindercone behind the beach erodes constantly, which continually enlarges the cove. This hill is rich in iron, and is the reason why the beach's sand is such a deep red.
Kaihalulu is extremely isolated and requires a fairly short, yet perilous hike to reach. The trail to the beach crosses over private property and follows a ridge high above the ocean below. The path is rather steep and narrow, and is quite slippery due to the loose and crumbling cinder as well as needles from nearby ironwood trees. The trail also passes by an ancient Japanese cemetery. Because of the beach's isolation and difficult access, some visitors consider it to be clothing-optional.

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